New research shows that dolphins recognize their friends by their taste | National Geographic

We humans recognize our friends by different things, like their smile, their voice, or the way they walk. Biologists have known for several decades that dolphins make friends, and that they recognize mates through their unique whistling. Surprising recent research shows that bottlenose dolphins use their sense of taste to distinguish the urine of their … Read more

Hundreds of beagles died in the lab before the government intervened | National Geographic

“The research we are conducting is required by regulatory authorities around the world before marketing new life-saving drugs,” she wrote. For more than twenty years, Inotiv has been directly and indirectly involved in the development of alternative methods of biomedical research. Snicker could not immediately comment on the seizure of the dogs from the Invigo … Read more

Giant ray discovered in a deep pond at the bottom of the Mekong River | National Geographic

Stung Treng, Cambodia When you see the Mekong River slowly flowing from Laos through sandy beaches and lush islands to neighboring Cambodia, it’s hard to imagine the amount of life beneath the mysterious river’s surface. An estimated 200 billion fish spawn in this part of the river alone, which is about 150 kilometers long, making … Read more

Bats imitate wasps to avoid being eaten by owls | National Geographic

Imitation is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom. Some caterpillars can be dangerous snakes. Young sooty sad tyrant, who lives in the Amazon, turns into poisonous larvae. In their evolution, hovercraft have adapted to resemble stinging and obnoxious wasps. They are all examples of batesian mimicry, an evolutionary trick in which a relatively harmless … Read more

The War in Ukraine: What Happens to the Pets Left Behind? † National Geographic

Anyone who has to flee their home, neighborhood, city, or country during a war has to make difficult decisions about what to do with them. So did the many people who boarded one of the overcrowded and extremely limited trains in Ukraine. In the European Union there are rules that determine which pets are allowed … Read more

The War in Ukraine: What Happens to the Pets Left Behind? † National Geographic

Anyone who has to flee their home, neighborhood, city, or country during a war has to make difficult decisions about what to do with them. So did the many people who boarded one of the overcrowded and extremely limited trains in Ukraine. In the European Union there are rules that determine which pets are allowed … Read more

These spiders “ejaculate” themselves so they won’t be eaten after mating National Geographic

Male spiders, at risk of being eaten by females, have developed a clever escape stunt: They shoot themselves in the air after sex. When Shichang Zhang observed this phenomenon in a sample of a rut orb of a species Philoponella prominensThis was the first ever observation of a male spider ejaculating itself to avoid sexual … Read more

New application to protect endangered sea turtles | National Geographic

The app, called “SEE Shell,” used machine learning to determine whether a tortoiseshell item was 94% real or fake. The app looks for distinct patterns that show if a substance is natural. According to Alexander Robillard, a Smithsonian OCIO Data Science Lab employee who developed the computer software behind the app, the technology is the … Read more

Wild cockatoos learn to open trash cans by imitating species – first evidence of social learning

Beautiful parrots, more than half a meter in size with a bright yellow crest, originated in eastern Australia and the nearest islands there. Unlike the other 350 known species of parrot, the sulfur-tipped cockatoo thrives especially in urban areas. They are often considered a nuisance in cities due to their destructive behavior. For example, they … Read more