Learn about the power of horse inheritance and care

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Obe breeders or horse owners who “want to breed a foal with their mare” sometimes find stallion ratings an elusive proposition. However, these rankings refer to the best producing stallions in the world based on the performance of their offspring. Then the question quickly arises: What should a horse owner do with a foal from a stallion that will produce champions?


The answer is very simple: first of all enjoy the quality you have in your stable.

Know the ratios

It is important

However, keeping and processing this data is an invaluable gift. Whether you are a breeder or not, the pedigree and genetics of your horse tell you a lot. We must not lose sight of the fact that inheritance strength is not only important for sports. The stallion’s inheritance also includes health, character, and the will to work. As a horse owner, feel free to translate the latter as “life force and fighting spirit to overcome illness or injury.” Many show breeders just want a horse that is manageable and healthy. This is why research on inheritance history is so important.

From book to screen

Some 20 years ago, breeders had to rely on the (expensive) books of Bernd Eylers and on yearly changing editions of the German FN, as the breeding strength of stallions was tested against the performance of their offspring. Although this is valuable information, it is not within the reach of every Flemish breeder.

We were fortunate in Flanders because we were able to draw on the expertise of our stallion owners. Then, during the final winter months, the stallions show they have been so eagerly waiting for. After all, the stallions were the creators, and the mares simply did what was expected of them.

Not just any mare

Marie Nikita (v. Jucional di Borneval v. Almi x Lorano v. Lugano I), among others, the dam of the stallion Toulon, was a striking example of a strong legacy. Her sire, Jocquinal de Borneval, was not the tallest in stature, but he was a direct son of the legendary Almy Z, and was a distinguished jumper. The performance was also no stranger to the Dutch Dam line. So Nikita, along with Heartbreaker, produced the Toulon phenomenon and his brother Vancouver DuVray. With Apache du Forest this was Rouen (1.60m), with Heartbreaker’s Daughter Quina (1.50m) and with T&L’s Quincerot, T&L’s Elle est Belle (see photo) saw the light of day. Quincerot is the son of Quiet Capitol vs Quidam de Revel x Corrado I).

These are just anthologies, because the high-quality offspring of Nikita with stallions of different plumage speaks for itself. The mare Nikita owns a BWP Paper and was born to Peet Dieleman in Axel. The owners of the stallions Tilleman & Lenaerts cherished her offspring and wrote a very beautiful story.

A healthy, well-groomed horse

It is a valuable asset

The average young horse owner can of course pass on this success story Consider it a utopia. So this is not true. Thanks to the insight, experience and risky adventures of these people, our country can boast healthy jumping shows that are coveted all over the world.

This is again evidenced by the fact that BWP can – once again – call themselves the best jumping horse writers in the world, this year thanks to performances by Joyride S (by Toulon), Katanga van Het Dingeshof (by Cardento 933), Igor van de Wittemoere (by Cooper van de Heffinck), H&M Indiana (by Kashmir van Schuttershof), as Diamond van het Schaeck (by Diamant de Semilly) and the unprecedented King Edward (by Edward 28). Anyone who thinks all of these horses come from huge breeding farms is out of luck. It is certain that the amendments were preceded by deliberations, consultations and information gathering.

KSmall country with great breeders

You just have to look at the map of Flanders and study the distribution of sport horse breeders. It’s hard to describe this small area as world class. All these horses didn’t just take root there. No, these horses are very expertly bred. Born from the mind of a large or medium-sized breeder, it is a horse that focuses his or her life on a passion that requires investments and, above all, a lot of work and care. It’s a passion that you can’t set a price for and that can’t really be paid for with money.

Always keep going

for quality

There was a saying in Flanders that “breeding was gambling”. Gambling is rarely a good idea in breeding sport horses. Many resources are available today to encourage good matings, such as studying the bloodlines of mares and stallions, seeing young horses in action – winter stallion competition hasn’t been around that long, by the way – after the classic course, foaling competitions and visit free jumping competitions… You can also use valuable tools such as Hippomundo.be and follow the results of competitions online.

We have many means at our disposal that allow justified choices. Their use is the message. It’s always good to have a foal for yourself from a mare you’ve had fun with for years. Quality is not only important in top sports, but also in everyday life. Never make the mistake of being left without a foal from a healthy, well-bred mare. The void and its potential is unbearable for a hobby horse owner. And if you ever serve or want to sell, you’ll always have one foot forward with proven bloodlines.

Look objectively at the Persians

Therefore, it is not the case that a hobby horse owner should not have an eye on bloodlines. The study and available bloodline data also allow for the breeding of healthy horses. Even if you don’t expect a companion horse to jump 1.60 metres, an easy personality and the right legs are always a good breeding goal. Gone are the days of letting a mare be covered by a stallion whose charms you’ve put down. Today – more than ever – mares are looked at, which determine the outcome of the crossing by at least 60%. So no longer just look for what you can improve in a mare, but also look at her qualities and choose the stallion that goes the extra mile. Best bird in hand out of 10 in the air!

Farm Life wishes you a wonderful year full of horses!


Patricia Bourguignon

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