MBO school infected with bird flu, and the execution of 1,200 animals

main picture 1:
TXT 1 lead image: Disinfection operations have already been carried out on various poultry farms in recent months. Photo: ANP
main picture 2:
TXT 2 lead image: For the next three months, it will not be possible to learn and work with poultry or birds in Aeres. Photo: ANP
A bird is being tested for bird flu.  Photo: ANP

A bird is being tested for bird flu. Photo: ANP

BANNEFIELD – Avian influenza was diagnosed at Aeres Vocational High School in Barnefield. This confirms Director Gertwim de Haas of the Barneveld Educational Foundation, which offers many animal care courses. Monday has become a deeply feared reality since last weekend, but actually for much longer. The school, located in the heart of the poultry sector, was hit hard.

Avian influenza has seriously affected our county for nearly a year now. Poultry farms have been under national confinement obligation since October, and several executions have already taken place in recent months. At Aeres, Principal de Haas says, they have held out and taken precautions to prevent their educational institution from having to deal with an outbreak.

Several measures have been taken

“We put extra mats in front of the doors and created locks between the rooms. As per protocol, not everyone was allowed into the poultry house anymore, but only a limited number of animal caretakers. We monitored the health of the birds closely every day and they were on extra alert, because It is found here on many poultry farms in the area,” explains de Haas. However, bird flu did not pass the doors of Aeres.

De Haas sighs: “Last Friday there were signs that some waterfowl were sick. They seemed to be more susceptible to it. At the end of the day, a bird had already died. Then we sent samples to Lelystad.”

1200 animals were culled preventively

The Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority arrived on Tuesday and officially identified the outbreak. After that, the financial value of the animals was determined, and on Tuesday the preventive culling of almost all poultry, with the exception of tropical birds, will begin. In total there are about 1200 animals. Director de Haas looks at her sadly and describes the events as “very sad”.

Disinfection operations have already been carried out on various poultry farms in recent months. – Photo: ANP

“Not only because of the animals and animal welfare, but also for colleagues who have worked hard for years to collect a beautiful collection of waterfowl: ibis, pelicans, ducks, cranes, pet birds. Many of these birds are uninfected, but they are culled preventively,” he says. De Haas. He wonders what more he could have done to keep bird flu at bay. “Yes, close the school. But that’s not possible.”

Empathy with the students

His heart also goes out to the students and apprentices at Aeres. The mbo offers courses such as animal care, equestrian sports, veterinary medicine, livestock and greenery and has about two thousand students. In addition, there are about two thousand students who regularly follow an Aeres course. Anyone who wants to work with animals will likely sooner or later qualify for Barneveld training.

Many of these students have a background in the agricultural or animal sector and also deal with animals outside their school gates. “In that respect, it’s still a miracle that it has lasted so long,” de Haas says. “In recent years, many companies have already been affected in this environment. It was every time fingers intertwined Our. We’ve done everything we can. But once it’s in the air…”

For the next three months, it will not be possible to learn and work with poultry or birds in Aeres. – Photo: ANP

No poultry for three months

The immediate future looks bleak for students and teachers who are used to working with birds and poultry on a daily basis. After the executions, there will be no poultry at the Aeres site for three months. “Hopefully in a month or two we can start with some lab animals,” says de Haas. “After that we have to rebuild it by raising birds.”

The courses offered by Barneveld School also work with other animals, such as camels, alpacas, and rodents. can continue. “Many animals remain, but we cannot give practical lessons on poultry and waterfowl at the moment. The school year has just begun.”

See also:

Leave a Comment